sometimesiamcreative:

Artist Statement
The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to think about a loss they’ve experienced, and creating models of these objects, people, or ideas. While born from my own musings about loss, Lost and Found has become a vehicle for exploring ideas of value and preciousness. After all, the value of an object or memory is perceived as much greater once it is lost, and through loss one discovers what it is they value.
I’ve written about this project in its earliest form before. Essentially, I am looking for stories of loss to build upon the archive that I have already collected. Originally I wanted to have some kind of personal interaction with everyone involved, but I am hoping that this way I can reach more people and give the project a wider scope.
If you’d like to contribute to this project, please send an email to to jo.a.pank@gmail.com with the subject “Lost and Found” the following information:
1) Your name or pseudonym
2) A story of something you’ve lost. This can be a single word or several sentences, whatever your inclination is. It doesn’t need to require a great deal of thought (unless you want it to!) and can be the first thing that comes to mind.
3) A mailing address. I will keep all the addresses I receive private. Should you wish to withhold that information for the time being that’s absolutely fine, but upon the project’s completion I am planning to send all of the participants a piece of the project, so please consider it.
4) Whether or not you would like to receive updates on the project. (This blog is where I have been posting my academic writing on my progress, if anyone is interested. I also plan to post on this blog).
Any contributions are sincerely appreciated! And by all means, tell anyone you think would be interested in participating.

sometimesiamcreative:

Artist Statement

The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to think about a loss they’ve experienced, and creating models of these objects, people, or ideas. While born from my own musings about loss, Lost and Found has become a vehicle for exploring ideas of value and preciousness. After all, the value of an object or memory is perceived as much greater once it is lost, and through loss one discovers what it is they value.

I’ve written about this project in its earliest form before. Essentially, I am looking for stories of loss to build upon the archive that I have already collected. Originally I wanted to have some kind of personal interaction with everyone involved, but I am hoping that this way I can reach more people and give the project a wider scope.

If you’d like to contribute to this project, please send an email to to jo.a.pank@gmail.com with the subject “Lost and Found” the following information:

1) Your name or pseudonym

2) A story of something you’ve lost. This can be a single word or several sentences, whatever your inclination is. It doesn’t need to require a great deal of thought (unless you want it to!) and can be the first thing that comes to mind.

3) A mailing address. I will keep all the addresses I receive private. Should you wish to withhold that information for the time being that’s absolutely fine, but upon the project’s completion I am planning to send all of the participants a piece of the project, so please consider it.

4) Whether or not you would like to receive updates on the project. (This blog is where I have been posting my academic writing on my progress, if anyone is interested. I also plan to post on this blog).

Any contributions are sincerely appreciated! And by all means, tell anyone you think would be interested in participating.

Artist Statement The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to think about a loss they’ve experienced, and creating models of these objects, people, or ideas. While born from my own musings about loss, Lost and Found has become a vehicle for exploring ideas of value and preciousness. After all, the value of an object or memory is perceived as much greater once it is lost, and through loss one discovers what it is they value.
I’ve written about this project in its earliest form before. Essentially, I am looking for stories of loss to build upon the archive that I have already collected. Originally I wanted to have some kind of personal interaction with everyone involved, but I am hoping that this way I can reach more people and give the project a wider scope.
If you’d like to contribute to this project, please send an email to jo.a.pank@gmail.com with the subject “Lost and Found” the following information:
1) Your name or pseudonym
2) A story of something you’ve lost. This can be a single word or several sentences, whatever your inclination is. It doesn’t need to require a great deal of thought (unless you want it to!) and can be the first thing that comes to mind.
3) A mailing address. I will keep all the addresses I receive private. Should you wish to withhold that information for the time being that’s absolutely fine, but upon the project’s completion I am planning to send all of the participants a piece of the project, so please consider it.
4) Whether or not you would like to receive updates on the project. (This blog is where I have been posting my academic writing on my progress, if anyone is interested. I also plan to post on this blog).
Any contributions are sincerely appreciated! And by all means, tell anyone you think would be interested in participating.

Artist Statement
The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to think about a loss they’ve experienced, and creating models of these objects, people, or ideas. While born from my own musings about loss, Lost and Found has become a vehicle for exploring ideas of value and preciousness. After all, the value of an object or memory is perceived as much greater once it is lost, and through loss one discovers what it is they value.

I’ve written about this project in its earliest form before. Essentially, I am looking for stories of loss to build upon the archive that I have already collected. Originally I wanted to have some kind of personal interaction with everyone involved, but I am hoping that this way I can reach more people and give the project a wider scope.

If you’d like to contribute to this project, please send an email to jo.a.pank@gmail.com with the subject “Lost and Found” the following information:

1) Your name or pseudonym

2) A story of something you’ve lost. This can be a single word or several sentences, whatever your inclination is. It doesn’t need to require a great deal of thought (unless you want it to!) and can be the first thing that comes to mind.

3) A mailing address. I will keep all the addresses I receive private. Should you wish to withhold that information for the time being that’s absolutely fine, but upon the project’s completion I am planning to send all of the participants a piece of the project, so please consider it.

4) Whether or not you would like to receive updates on the project. (This blog is where I have been posting my academic writing on my progress, if anyone is interested. I also plan to post on this blog).

Any contributions are sincerely appreciated! And by all means, tell anyone you think would be interested in participating.

Artist Statement

The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to think about a loss they’ve experienced, and creating models of these objects, people, or ideas. While born from my own musings about loss, Lost and Found has become a vehicle for exploring ideas of value and preciousness. After all, the value of an object or memory is perceived as much greater once it is lost, and through loss one discovers what it is they value.

I’ve written about this project in its earliest form before. Essentially, I am looking for stories of loss to build upon the archive that I have already collected. Originally I wanted to have some kind of personal interaction with everyone involved, but I am hoping that this way I can reach more people and give the project a wider scope. 

If you’d like to contribute to this project, please send an email to to jo.a.pank@gmail.com with the subject “Lost and Found” the following information:

1) Your name or pseudonym

2) A story of something you’ve lost. This can be a single word or several sentences, whatever your inclination is. It doesn’t need to require a great deal of thought (unless you want it to!) and can be the first thing that comes to mind.

3) A mailing address. I will keep all the addresses I receive private. Should you wish to withhold that information for the time being that’s absolutely fine, but upon the project’s completion I am planning to send all of the participants a piece of the project, so please consider it.

4) Whether or not you would like to receive updates on the project. (This blog is where I have been posting my academic writing on my progress, if anyone is interested. I also plan to post on this blog).

Any contributions are sincerely appreciated! And by all means, tell anyone you think would be interested in participating.

Artist Statement

The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to think about a loss they’ve experienced, and creating models of these objects, people, or ideas. While born from my own musings about loss, Lost and Found has become a vehicle for exploring ideas of value and preciousness. After all, the value of an object or memory is perceived as much greater once it is lost, and through loss one discovers what it is they value.

I’ve written about this project in its earliest form before. Essentially, I am looking for stories of loss to build upon the archive that I have already collected. Originally I wanted to have some kind of personal interaction with everyone involved, but I am hoping that this way I can reach more people and give the project a wider scope.

If you’d like to contribute to this project, please send an email to to jo.a.pank@gmail.com with the subject “Lost and Found” the following information:

1) Your name or pseudonym

2) A story of something you’ve lost. This can be a single word or several sentences, whatever your inclination is. It doesn’t need to require a great deal of thought (unless you want it to!) and can be the first thing that comes to mind.

3) A mailing address. I will keep all the addresses I receive private. Should you wish to withhold that information for the time being that’s absolutely fine, but upon the project’s completion I am planning to send all of the participants a piece of the project, so please consider it.

4) Whether or not you would like to receive updates on the project. (This blog is where I have been posting my academic writing on my progress, if anyone is interested. I also plan to post on this blog).

Any contributions are sincerely appreciated! And by all means, tell anyone you think would be interested in participating.

Lost & Found

imightchangethislater:

sometimesiamcreative:

Artist Statement

The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to…

Thanks so much to all who have shared this. Please submit to my project! It is open to any and all who wish to participate, and requires but a few moments of reflection (and to send an email).

(via sometimesiamcreative)

Lost & Found

imightchangethislater:

sometimesiamcreative:

Artist Statement

The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to…

Thanks so much to all who have shared this. Please submit to my project! It is open to any and all who wish to participate, and requires but a few moments of reflection (and to send an email).

Lost & Found

sometimesiamcreative:

Artist Statement

The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to think about a loss they’ve experienced, and creating models of these objects, people, or ideas. While born from my own musings about loss, Lost and Found has become a vehicle for exploring ideas of value and preciousness. After all, the value of an object or memory is perceived as much greater once it is lost, and through loss one discovers what it is they value.

I’ve written about this project in its earliest form before. Essentially, I am looking for stories of loss to build upon the archive that I have already collected. Originally I wanted to have some kind of personal interaction with everyone involved, but I am hoping that this way I can reach more people and give the project a wider scope. 

If you’d like to contribute to this project, please send an email to to jo.a.pank@gmail.com with the subject “Lost and Found” the following information:

1) Your name or pseudonym

2) A story of something you’ve lost. This can be a single word or several sentences, whatever your inclination is. It doesn’t need to require a great deal of thought (unless you want it to!) and can be the first thing that comes to mind.

3) A mailing address. I will keep all the addresses I receive private. Should you wish to withhold that information for the time being that’s absolutely fine, but upon the project’s completion I am planning to send all of the participants a piece of the project, so please consider it.

4) Whether or not you would like to receive updates on the project. (This blog is where I have been posting my academic writing on my progress, if anyone is interested. I also plan to post on this blog).

Any contributions are sincerely appreciated! And by all means, tell anyone you think would be interested in participating. 

Lost & Found

Artist Statement

The word loss brings different things to mind for different people. Obviously losing one’s keys is not the same as losing a loved one, but a single idea encompasses the range of these experiences. I am attempting to give others an opportunity to think about a loss they’ve experienced, and creating models of these objects, people, or ideas. While born from my own musings about loss, Lost and Found has become a vehicle for exploring ideas of value and preciousness. After all, the value of an object or memory is perceived as much greater once it is lost, and through loss one discovers what it is they value.

I’ve written about this project in its earliest form before. Essentially, I am looking for stories of loss to build upon the archive that I have already collected. Originally I wanted to have some kind of personal interaction with everyone involved, but I am hoping that this way I can reach more people and give the project a wider scope. 

If you’d like to contribute to this project, please send an email to to jo.a.pank@gmail.com with the subject “Lost and Found” the following information:

1) Your name or pseudonym

2) A story of something you’ve lost. This can be a single word or several sentences, whatever your inclination is. It doesn’t need to require a great deal of thought (unless you want it to!) and can be the first thing that comes to mind.

3) A mailing address. I will keep all the addresses I receive private. Should you wish to withhold that information for the time being that’s absolutely fine, but upon the project’s completion I am planning to send all of the participants a piece of the project, so please consider it.

4) Whether or not you would like to receive updates on the project. (This blog is where I have been posting my academic writing on my progress, if anyone is interested. I also plan to post on this blog).

Any contributions are sincerely appreciated! And by all means, tell anyone you think would be interested in participating. 

Does any artist who has sold their work on consignment have any advice for doing so?

stormphyre:

supaslim:

Been thinking a lot about production ceramics today, for obvious reasons and because I am feeling pissy about how artists of certain media treat ceramics on the whole.

The fallacy: Since ceramics are functional, they are utensils, not art.

My thoughts: All art serves a function. We hang art and photos on our walls when we like how they look and how they make us feel and what they make us think about. They brighten our homes and our lives with their visibility. Ceramics do this too! A beautiful vase or jar can improve your daily life the same way a gorgeous painting can. And some ceramics may be extremely functional, like mugs, but they are also still art. Somebody sat down, worked clay with their hands and minds, designed and conceived and produced a thing of beauty flavored with their own style and preferences, the same way a painter works with paint and canvas, or a photographer works with light and lens and developing techniques.

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I think functional art is beautiful. Look at designer furniture- it is as much art as it is functional.

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Ceramics are no different. They are beautiful, and they store cotton balls. They make you happy, and they are perfectly shaped to hold flowers. They lift your spirits, and it’s perfect for your morning coffee. Through use, the work only gains value and meaning. It does not lose its worth the moment it becomes more than just a pretty thing to look at.

This is one of the major differences between western and eastern ceramics, by the way. Western culture prefers the pristine, clean, highly refined pieces, and when a piece shows signs of wear, it is “damaged.” Eastern culture celebrates the imperfections and variations, and they view the use of the work as favorable.

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And that’s just for work that IS functional! Many sculptors and potters produce work that is non-functional, and decorative only. Functionality does not define the artistic value of the piece.

Fallacy: But painters don’t mass produce work the way furniture companies and potters do. The mass production cheapens the product.

My thoughts: No, the mass production keeps the artist from going bankrupt and disperses their work as broadly as possible. Most of us will never end up in museums. But if we make a hundred similar mugs, and each of those mugs goes to a different home, then we will have quietly influenced a hundred lives. Those people will live with our art, appreciate it, love it, embrace it, and make it a part of their lives. If only one person gets a mug, then only that person will have been touched. The goal is not to be some prestigious arrogant hoity toity artist with a stick jammed up their ass, but to disperse work as widely as possible and keep food on the table.

Fallacy: Okay, but ceramics aren’t conceptual. Painting is. That’s what defines art.

My thoughts: But not all painting considered art are conceptual. The Mona Lisa? That was the Renaissance’s equivalent of portrait photography, made only because somebody paid Leo to paint her so they could hang her face on the wall. The Last Supper? That was illustrative, and also church propaganda- no real thought there.

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(And this was a selfie.)

On the ceramics side, there are also highly conceptual pieces.

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So really, if you’re gonna try to tell me that ceramics aren’t art just because it’s dirt based, I’m gonna tell you right where you can shove your prejudices. Because you’re wrong.

A+ thoughts, Slim. A+.

nicecupbro:

freundly:

Well known and respected ceramic artist, Christa Assad, needs our help. A recent fire left her with a broken back, homeless and unable to work for a minimum of three months.
Currently there is a raffle being held with a number of amazing ceramics works by different artists to help.
Visit https://www.youcaring.com/christaassad to see all the great work

YOU GUYS!!!!

nicecupbro:

freundly:

Well known and respected ceramic artist, Christa Assad, needs our help. A recent fire left her with a broken back, homeless and unable to work for a minimum of three months.

Currently there is a raffle being held with a number of amazing ceramics works by different artists to help.

Visit https://www.youcaring.com/christaassad to see all the great work

YOU GUYS!!!!

(Source: bfreundly)